Electrical Safety Operation and Maintenance


Electrical Safety Operation and Maintenance

File : pdf, 2.2 MB, 225 pages

TOC

CHAPT 1 INTRODUCTION
1-1 PURPOSE
1-2 SCOPE
1-4 CODES, STANDARDS, AND PUBLICATIONS
1-5 VARIANCES FROM NORMAL SAFETY PRACTICES
1-6 WARNINGS AND NOTES
1-7 ELECTRICAL HAZARDS
1-7.1 Electrical Shock Dangers and Effects
1-7.2 Danger from Arcs and Blasts
1-7.3 Workplace Dangers
1-7.4 Health Hazards of Asbestos
1-8 MISHAP RESPONSE
1-9 COMMUNICATIONS

CHAPT 2 WORKER/CREW RESPONSIBILITIES
2-1 LEVELS OF RESPONSIBILITY
2-2 ELECTRICAL WORKER QUALIFICATIONS
2-3 SAFETY MEETINGS
2-4 WORK SITE SAFETY
2-5 JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS/JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
2-6 SAFETY COMPLIANCE

CHAPT 3 PRE-SITE SAFETY MANAGEMENT
3-1 WORK LOCATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
3-1.1 Working Near Energized Circuits
3-1.2 Work Location
3-2 PUBLIC SAFETY
3-2.1 Warning Devices
3-2.2 Flagmen
3-2.3 Excavations
3-3 NUMBER OF WORKERS REQUIRED
3-4 VERIFYING SYSTEM AND EQUIPMENT PROVISIONS

CHAPT 4 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
4-1 INTRODUCTION
4-2 INSPECTION OF APPAREL, TOOLS, AND MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT
4-3 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE APPAREL
4-3.1 Applicable Documents
4-3.2 General Clothing Considerations
4-4 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR ARC FLASH PROTECTION
4-5 AIR FORCE PPE REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH-VOLTAGE OVERHEAD LINE WORK AT 69 KV (NOMINAL) OR LESS
4-6 CLOTHING PROHIBITIONS
4-7 SKIN PROTECTION
4-8 POLE/TREE CLIMBING AND FALL PROTECTION
4-8.1 Personal Protective Equipment
4-8.2 Climbing Personal Protective Equipment
4-8.3 Fall Protection Personal Protective Equipment

CHAPT 5 WORK AREA PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS
5-1 INTRODUCTION
5-2 RUBBER PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
5-3 ELEVATED WORK
5-4 LIVE-LINE (HOT-LINE) TOOLS
5-5 ELECTRICAL TESTING DEVICES
5-5.1 Electrical Testing Device Calibration
5-5.2 Voltage Detectors
5-5.3 Phasing Testers
5-5.4 Line Fault Locators
5-5.5 Insulator Testers
5-5.6 Leakage-Current Monitors
5-5.7 Combustible Gas/Oxygen Detectors

CHAPT 6 ENERGY CONTROL (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT)
6-1 SAFE CLEARANCE AND LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURES
6-2 ENERGY CONTROL (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT)
6-2.1 Low-Voltage Levels (600 Volts and Below)
6-2.2 High-Voltage Levels (>600 Volts to 69,000 Volts)
6-.3 INSPECTIONS AND TRAINING

CHAPT 7 DEENERGIZED LINE GROUNDING
7-1 TEMPORARY GROUNDING
7-1.1 Testing
7-1.2 Installation Criteria
7-1.3 Temporary Grounding System Components
7-1.4 Equipotential Zone
7-1.5 Ground Connection and Electrodes
7-2 TEMPORARY GROUNDING OF SUBSTATION CURRENT-CARRYING EQUIPMENT COMPONENTS
7-3 AERIAL LIFT TRUCK VEHICLE GROUNDING
7-4 TEMPORARY GROUNDING OF UNDERGROUND LINES
7-5 OPENING OR SPLICING DEENERGIZED CONDUCTORS
7-6 GROUNDING FOR STRINGING AND REMOVING LINES
7-7 TEMPORARY GROUNDING OF AERIAL LINES

CHAPT 8 ENERGIZED LINE WORK
8-1 WORK ON ENERGIZED CIRCUITS
8-2 ENERGIZED WORK RULES
8-2.1 Permitted Work
8-2.2 Personal Protective Equipment
8-2.3 Statement of Qualifications
8-2.4 Work Methods for Voltage Levels
8-2.5 Pre-Work Procedures
8-2.6 General Job-in-Progress Procedures

CHAPTR 9 SUBSTATIONS AND SWITCHGEAR
9-1 SUBSTATION WORK
9-1.1 Purpose of Substation
9-1.2 Diagrams and Schematics
9-1.3 Engineering Guidance
9-1.4 System Operation
9-1.5 Abnormal Conditions
9-1.6 Defective Equipment
9-2 SWITCHING
9-3 FUSES
9-3.1 Characteristics
9-3.2 Fuse Handling
9-3.3 Operation of Energized Fuses
9-3.4 Open Fuse Holder
9-3.5 Closed-Position Fuse Locking
9-3.6 Bypassing
9-4 ENERGY STORING PROTECTIVE DEVICES
9-5 INSTRUMENT TRANSFORMERS
9-5.1 Potential (Voltage) Transformers (PT)
9-5.2 Current Transformers (CT)
9-6 POWER TRANSFORMERS AND REGULATORS
9-6.1 Transformers (Power and Distribution)
9-6.2 Voltage Regulators
9-7 METALCLAD SWITCHGEAR
9-8 STATIONARY BATTERIES
9-8.1 Basis for Safety Requirements
9-8.2 Protective Equipment
9-8.3 Safety Precautions
9-9 INSULATING OIL HANDLING OPERATIONS

CHAPT 10 AERIAL LINES
10-1 AERIAL LINE WORK
10-2 POLE HANDLING OPERATIONS
10-2.1 General
10-2.2 Pole Contact Precautions
10-2.3 Receiving Pole Shipment
10-2.4 Ground Handling
10-2.5 Long Term Pole Storage
10-2.6 Temporary Pole Storage
10-2.7 Hauling Poles
10-3 POLE INSTALLATION, REPLACEMENT, AND REMOVAL
10-4 CLIMBING AND WORKING ON POLES
10-4.1 General Rules
10-4.2 Pole Inspection Before Climbing
10-5 POLE CLIMBING EQUIPMENT
10-5.1 General Rules
10-5.2 Wooden Pole Climbing Equipment
10-5.3 Concrete and Steel Pole Climbing
10-6 POLE CLIMBING AND WORK PRECAUTIONS
10-7 CROSSING STRUCTURES
10-8 STRINGING OR REMOVING DEENERGIZED CONDUCTORS AND OVERHEAD GROUND WIRES
10-9 ENERGIZED WORK
10-10 STREET LIGHTING
10-11 WORKING ON OR NEAR POLE-MOUNTED EQUIPMENT
10-11.1 Surge Arresters
10-11.2 Switches and Fuses
10-11.3 Capacitors
10-11.4 Power Transformers and Voltage Regulators
10-12 AERIAL ROPE
10-13 TOOLS
10-14 AERIAL LIFTS AND INSULATED BUCKETS
10-15 TREE TRIMMING AND BRUSH REMOVAL

CHAPT 11 UNDERGROUND LINES
11-1 UNDERGROUND WORK
11-2 GENERAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS
11-3 CABLE PULLING
11-4 BURIED ELECTRICAL CABLES
11-5 DAMAGE TO EXISTING UTILITY LINES
11-6 PREPARING TO WORK UNDERGROUND
11-6.1 General Atmosphere Control Precautions Before Entry
11-6.2 Atmosphere Testing Before Entering Underground Structures
11-6.3 Atmospheric Test Equipment
11-6.4 Stray Electrical Voltage Testing
11-6.5 Pumping a Manhole
11-6.6 Removal of Duct Plugs
11-6.7 Emergency Entrance
11-6.8 Ventilation of Underground Structures
11-7 WORK INSIDE UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES

CHAPT 12 LOW-VOLTAGE INTERIOR SYSTEMS
12-1 WORKING ON INDOOR EQUIPMENT
12-1.1 Restricted Space
12-1.2 Grounding Systems
12-1.3 Disconnection of Power Sources
12-1.4 Related Building Systems
12-2 LOW-VOLTAGE SYSTEMS
12-2.1 Overview
12-2.2 Battery Room Hazards
12-2.3 Fire Alarm Systems
12-2.4 Solid-State Equipment
12-2.5 Low-Voltage Work Precautions
12-3 ROTATING MACHINERY
12-3.1 Hazards of Rotating Machinery
12-3.2 Motors and Generators

CHAPT 13 SHORE-TO-SHIP ELECTRICAL POWER CONNECTIONS
13-1 CONNECT/DISCONNECT RESPONSIBILITIES
13-2 SHIP’S MAIN ELECTRICAL SERVICE COMPONENTS
13-2.1 Shore High-Voltage Distribution System
13-2.2 Pier Substations
13-2.3 Ship-to-Shore Pier Electrical Outlet Assemblies
13-2.4 Ship-to-Shore Power Cables and Connectors
13-3 SHIP’S ELECTRICAL SERVICE COMPONENT RELATIONS
13-4 UNUSUAL SHORE-TO-SHIP SYSTEM HAZARDS
13-4.1 Split Personnel Responsibilities
13-4.2 Portable Power Cable and Outlet Safety Assurance
13-4.3 Electrical Equipment Accessibility and Working Space
13-4.4 Ship’s Electrical Power Input Safety
13-4.5 Parallel Operation
13-5 SUPPORTING SHORE-TO-SHIP SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
13-5.1 Specialized Shore-to-Ship System Training
13-5.2 Specific SOPs
13-6 PORTABLE SHORE POWER CABLES AND RECEPTACLES
13-6.1 Low-Voltage Terminations and Protective Circuit Breakers
13-6.2 High-Voltage (4,160 Volt and 15 kV) Terminations and Protective Circuit Breakers
13-7 SHIP CONNECTION PROCEDURES BEFORE SHIP DOCKS
13-8 SHORE-TO-SHIP POWER CABLE RIGGING AFTER SHIP DOCKS
13-9 SHIP’S TRANSFER TO SHORE POWER

CHAPT 14 ELECTRICAL WORKER RESCUE
14-1 RESCUE TRAINING
14-2 POLE-TOP RESCUE
14-3 RESCUE FROM A MANHOLE
14-4 RESCUE FROM AN AERIAL LIFT (BUCKET TRUCK)
14-5 ELECTRICAL SHOCK

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