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Foundation Design and Construction Pdf

  


by Filed under civil engineering

Foundation Design and Construction

TOC

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 PURPOSE AND SCOPE
1.2 GENERAL GUIDANCE

2. SITE INVESTIGATION, GEOLOGICAL MODELS AND SELECTION OF DESIGN PARAMETERS
2.1 GENERAL
2.2 DESK STUDIES
2.2.1 Site History
2.2.2 Details of Adjacent Structures and Existing Foundations
2.2.3 Geological Studies
2.2.4 Groundwater
2.3 EXECUTION OF GROUND INVESTIGATION
2.4 EXTENT OF GROUND INVESTIGATION
2.4.1 General Sites
2.4.2 Sites Underlain by Marble
2.5 SOIL AND ROCK SAMPLING
2.6 DETECTION OF AGGRESSIVE GROUND
2.7 INSITU AND LABORATORY TESTING
2.8 ESTABLISHING A GEOLOGICAL MODEL
2.9 SELECTION OF DESIGN PARAMETERS

3. SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS
3.1 GENERAL
3.2 DESIGN OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS ON SOILS
3.2.1 Determination of Bearing Capacity of Soils
3.2.1.1 General
3.2.1.2 Empirical methods
3.2.1.3 Bearing capacity theory
3.2.2 Foundations On or Near the Crest of a Slope
3.2.3 Factors of Safety
3.2.4 Settlement Estimation
3.2.4.1 General
3.2.4.2 Foundations on granular soils
3.2.4.3 Foundations on fine-grained soils
3.2.5 Lateral Resistance of Shallow Foundations
3.3 DESIGN OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS ON ROCK
3.4 PLATE LOADING TEST
3.5 RAFT FOUNDATIONS

4. TYPES OF PILE
4.1 CLASSIFICATION OF PILES
4.2 LARGE-DISPLACEMENT PILES
4.2.1 General
4.2.2 Precast Reinforced Concrete Piles
4.2.3 Precast Prestressed Spun Concrete Piles
4.2.4 Closed-ended Steel Tubular Piles
4.2.5 Driven Cast-in-place Concrete Piles
4.3 SMALL-DISPLACEMENT PILES
4.3.1 General
4.3.2 Steel H-piles
4.3.3 Open-ended Steel Tubular Piles
4.4 REPLACEMENT PILES
4.4.1 General
4.4.2 Machine-dug Piles
4.4.2.1 Mini-piles
4.4.2.2 Socketed H-piles
4.4.2.3 Continuous flight auger piles
4.4.2.4 Large-diameter bored piles
4.4.2.5 Barrettes
4.4.3 Hand-dug Caissons
4.5 SPECIAL PILE TYPES
4.5.1 General
4.5.2 Shaft- and Base-grouted Piles
4.5.3 Jacked Piles
4.5.4 Composite Piles

5. CHOICE OF PILE TYPE AND DESIGN RESPONSIBILITY
5.1 GENERAL
5.2 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN CHOICE OF PILE TYPE
5.2.1 Ground Conditions
5.2.2 Complex Ground Conditions
5.2.3 Nature of Loading
5.2.4 Effects of Construction on Surrounding Structures and Environment
5.2.5 Site and Plant Constraints
5.2.6 Safety
5.2.7 Programme and Cost
5.3 REUSE OF EXISTING PILES
5.3.1 General
5.3.2 Verifications of Conditions
5.3.3 Durability Assessment
5.3.4 Load-carrying Capacity
5.3.5 Other Design Aspects
5.4 DESIGN RESPONSIBILITY
5.4.1 Contractor’s Design
5.4.2 Engineer’s Design
5.4.3 Discussions

6. DESIGN OF SINGLE PILES AND DEFORMATION OF PILES
6.1 GENERAL
6.2 PILE DESIGN IN RELATION TO GEOLOGY
6.3 DESIGN PHILOSOPHIES
6.3.1 General
6.3.2 Global Factor of Safety Approach
6.3.3 Limit State Design Approach
6.3.4 Discussions on Design Approaches
6.3.5 Recommended Factors of Safety
6.3.6 Planning for Future Redevelopments
6.4 AXIALLY LOADED PILES IN SOIL
6.4.1 General
6.4.2 Pile Driving Formulae
6.4.3 Wave Equation Analysis
6.4.4 Use of Soil Mechanics Principles
6.4.4.1 General
6.4.4.2 Critical depth concept
6.4.4.3 Bored piles in granular soils
6.4.4.4 Driven piles in granular soils
6.4.4.5 Bored piles in clays
6.4.4.6 Driven piles in clays
6.4.4.7 Other factors affecting shaft resistance
6.4.4.8 Effect of soil plug on open-ended pipe piles
6.4.5 Correlation with Standard Penetration Tests
6.4.5.1 General
6.4.5.2 End-bearing resistance
6.4.5.3 Shaft resistance
6.4.6 Correlation with Other Insitu Tests
6.5 AXIALLY LOADED PILES IN ROCK
6.5.1 General
6.5.2 Driven Piles in Rock
6.5.3 Bored Piles in Rock
6.5.4 Rock Sockets
6.6 UPLIFT CAPACITY OF PILES
6.6.1 Piles in Soil
6.6.2 Rock Sockets
6.6.3 Cyclic Loading
6.7 LATERAL LOAD CAPACITY OF PILES
6.8 NEGATIVE SKIN FRICTION
6.8.1 General
6.8.2 Calculation of Negative Skin Friction
6.8.3 Field Observations in Hong Kong
6.8.4 Means of Reducing Negative Skin Friction
6.9 TORSION
6.10 PRELIMINARY PILES FOR DESIGN EVALUATION
6.11 PILE DESIGN IN KARST MARBLE
6.12 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF PILES
6.12.1 General
6.12.2 Lifting Stresses
6.12.3 Driving and Working Stresses
6.12.4 Bending and Buckling of Piles
6.12.5 Mini-piles
6.13 DEFORMATION OF SINGLE PILES
6.14 CORROSION OF PILES

7. GROUP EFFECTS
7.1 GENERAL
7.2 MINIMUM SPACING OF PILES
7.3 ULTIMATE CAPACITY OF PILE GROUPS
7.3.1 General
7.3.2 Vertical Pile Groups in Granular Soils under Compression
7.3.2.1 Free-standing driven piles
7.3.2.2 Free-standing bored piles
7.3.2.3 Pile groups with ground bearing cap
7.3.3 Vertical Pile Groups in Clays under Compression
7.3.4 Vertical Pile Groups in Rock under Compression
7.3.5 Vertical Pile Groups under Lateral Loading
7.3.6 Vertical Pile Groups under Tension Loading
7.3.7 Pile Groups Subject to Eccentric Loading
7.4 NEGATIVE SKIN FRICTION ON PILE GROUPS
7.5 DEFORMATION OF PILE GROUPS
7.5.1 Axial Loading on Vertical Pile Groups
7.5.2 Lateral Loading on Vertical Pile Groups
7.5.3 Combined Loading on General Pile Groups 190
7.6 DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS IN SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION PROBLEMS
7.6.1 General
7.6.2 Load Distribution between Piles
7.6.3 Piled Raft Foundations
7.6.4 Use of Piles to Control Foundation Stiffness
7.6.5 Piles in Soils Undergoing Movement

8. PILE INSTALLATION AND CONSTRUCTION CONTROL
8.1 GENERAL
8.2 INSTALLATION OF DISPLACEMENT PILES
8.2.1 Equipment
8.2.2 Characteristics of Hammers and Vibratory Drivers
8.2.2.1 General
8.2.2.2 Drop hammers
8.2.2.3 Steam or compressed air hammers
8.2.2.4 Diesel hammers
8.2.2.5 Hydraulic hammers
8.2.2.6 Vibratory drivers
8.2.3 Selection of Method of Pile Installation
8.2.4 Potential Problems Prior to Pile Installation
8.2.5 Potential Problems during Pile Installation
8.2.5.1 General
8.2.5.2 Structural damage
8.2.5.3 Pile head protection assembly
8.2.5.4 Obstructions
8.2.5.5 Pile whipping and verticality
8.2.5.6 Toeing into rock
8.2.5.7 Pile extension
8.2.5.8 Pre-ignition of diesel hammers
8.2.5.9 Difficulties in achieving set
8.2.5.10 Set-up phenomenon
8.2.5.11 False set phenomenon
8.2.5.12 Piling sequence
8.2.5.13 Raking piles
8.2.5.14 Piles with bituminous or epoxy coating
8.2.5.15 Problems with marine piling
8.2.5.16 Driven cast-in-place piles
8.2.5.17 Cavernous marble
8.2.6 Potentially Damaging Effects of Construction and Mitigating Measures
8.2.6.1 Ground movement
8.2.6.2 Excess porewater pressure
8.2.6.3 Noise
8.2.6.4 Vibration
8.3 INSTALLATION OF MACHINE-DUG PILES
8.3.1 Equipment
8.3.1.1 Large-diameter bored piles
8.3.1.2 Mini-piles and socketed H-piles
8.3.1.3 Continuous flight auger (cfa) piles
8.3.1.4 Shaft- and base-grouted piles
8.3.2 Use of Drilling Fluid for Support of Excavation
8.3.3 Assessment of Founding Level and Condition of Pile Base
8.3.4 Potential Problems during Pile Excavation
8.3.4.1 General
8.3.4.2 Bore instability and overbreak
8.3.4.3 Stress relief and disturbance
8.3.4.4 Obstructions
8.3.4.5 Control of bentonite slurry
8.3.4.6 Base cleanliness and disturbance of founding materials
8.3.4.7 Position and verticality of pile bores
8.3.4.8 Vibration
8.3.4.9 Sloping rock surface
8.3.4.10 Inspection of piles
8.3.4.11 Recently reclaimed land
8.3.4.12 Bell-outs
8.3.4.13 Soft sediments
8.3.4.14 Piles in landfill and chemically contaminated ground
8.3.4.15 Cavernous marble
8.3.5 Potential Problems during Concreting
8.3.5.1 General
8.3.5.2 Quality of concrete
8.3.5.3 Quality of grout
8.3.5.4 Steel reinforcement
8.3.5.5 Placement of concrete in dry condition
8.3.5.6 Placement of concrete in piles constructed under water or bentonite
8.3.5.7 Concrete placement in continuous flight auger piles
8.3.5.8 Extraction of temporary casing
8.3.5.9 Effect of groundwater
8.3.5.10 Problems in soft ground
8.3.5.11 Cut-off levels
8.3.6 Potential Problems after Concreting
8.3.6.1 Construction of adjacent piles
8.3.6.2 Impact by construction plant
8.3.6.3 Damage during trimming
8.3.6.4 Cracking of piles due to thermal effects and ground movement
8.4 INSTALLATION OF HAND-DUG CAISSONS
8.4.1 General
8.4.2 Assessment of Condition of Pile Base
8.4.2.1 Hand-dug caissons in saprolites
8.4.2.2 Hand-dug caissons in rock
8.4.3 Potential Installation Problems and Construction Control Measures
8.4.3.1 General
8.4.3.2 Problems with groundwater
8.4.3.3 Base heave and shaft stability
8.4.3.4 Base softening
8.4.3.5 Effects on shaft resistance
8.4.3.6 Effects on blasting
8.4.3.7 Cavernous marble
8.4.3.8 Safety and health hazard
8.4.3.9 Construction control
8.5 INTEGRITY TESTS OF PILES
8.5.1 Role of Integrity Tests
8.5.2 Types of Non-destructive Integrity Tests
8.5.2.1 General
8.5.2.2 Sonic logging
8.5.2.3 Vibration (impedance) test
8.5.2.4 Echo (seismic or sonic integrity) test
8.5.2.5 Dynamic loading tests
8.5.3 Practical Considerations in the Use of Integrity Tests

9. PILE LOADING TESTS
9.1 GENERAL
9.2 TIMING OF PILE TESTS
9.3 STATIC PILE LOADING TESTS
9.3.1 Reaction Arrangement
9.3.1.1 Compression tests
9.3.1.2 Uplift loading tests
9.3.1.3 Lateral loading tests
9.3.2 Equipment
9.3.2.1 Measurement of load
9.3.2.2 Measurement of pile head movement
9.3.3 Test Procedures
9.3.3.1 General
9.3.3.2 Maintained-load tests
9.3.3.3 Constant rate of penetration tests
9.3.4 Instrumentation
9.3.4.1 General
9.3.4.2 Axial loading tests
9.3.4.3 Lateral loading tests
9.3.5 Interpretation of Test Results
9.3.5.1 General
9.3.5.2 Evaluation of failure load
9.3.5.3 Acceptance criteria
9.3.5.4 Axial loading tests on instrumented piles
9.3.5.5 Lateral loading tests
9.3.5.6 Other aspects of loading test interpretation
9.4 DYNAMIC LOADING TESTS
9.4.1 General
9.4.2 Test Methods
9.4.3 Methods of Interpretation
9.4.3.1 General
9.4.3.2 CASE method
9.4.3.3 CAPWAP method
9.4.3.4 SIMBAT method
9.4.3.5 Other methods of analysis
9.4.4 Recommendations on the Use of Dynamic Loading Tests

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One Response to “Foundation Design and Construction Pdf”

  1. please i need civil engineering handbook

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